The Smoothbeam laser is a well-known diode laser that has several uses, including the treatment of fine lines and wrinkles and acne scars. Smoothbeam treatment is gentle, safe, and requires no downtime. Treatments can be performed on all skin types and will not only result in improvement in the texture of the skin, but in acne reduction, as well.1

How Smoothbeam works

The Smoothbeam is a non-ablative laser, which means that it does not remove any of the skin’s surface during the treatment. It is very gentle and after a series of Smoothbeam treatments the skin appears refreshed and younger. Smoothbeam is used to treat:

What is the treatment like?

The procedure involves the delivery of a special wavelength of laser energy deep below the skin to the level of the dermis, stimulating collagen and smoothing the skin’s surface. The skin is protected by a simultaneous cool spray called collagen. The procedure is tolerated quite well and no downtime is required afterwards. Tanning must be avoided before and after the treatment.

How many treatments are required?

Generally four treatments are necessary at an interval of three weeks to four weeks apart.

Is Smoothbeam right for me if I have dark skin?

This treatment can be used effectively on dark skin.Clinical studies have shown Smoothbeam to be effective and safe for skin types I-V (skin phototypes I-V)1.

The settings and treatment plan will vary by individual and skin type, which allows us to provide safe and effective treatments to such a wide variety of skin types.

What treatments can be performed in combination with Smoothbeam?

Sapphire abrasion, Intense Pulsed Light, Vbeam pulsed dye laser as well as BOTOX and filler injections are commonly used with Smoothbeam laser. Smoothbeam laser treatments are great as a part of a comprehensive facial rejuvenation program.

Sources:

1. Tanzi, E. L. and Alster, T. S. (2004), Comparison of a 1450-nm Diode Laser and a 1320-nm Nd:YAG Laser in the Treatment of Atrophic Facial Scars: A Prospective Clinical and Histologic Study. Dermatologic Surgery, 30: 152–157. doi: 10.1111/j.1524-4725.2004.30078.x